Wednesday, January 6, 2010

GARDEN DESIGNERS BLOGLINK: TARA'S TRINITY OF THE SOUTHERN GARDEN

With, Tara's Trinity of the Southern Garden: Azaleas, Camellias, Hydrangeas, you'll have blooms everyday in your garden. Oakleaf hydrangea bloom late spring, mophead hydrangea bloom early summer & summer, 'Anna Belle' hydrangea bloom summer, 'Tardiva' & 'Pee Gee' hydrangea bloom late summer to frost. Above, lacecap hydrangea.

Southern Indica Azaleas, 'George Tabor', above, bloom in spring. They stand up to drought, bugs, cold. Use Exbury azaleas too, they bloom before 'George Tabor'.

Camellia sasanqua, above, bloom in fall. Camellia japonica bloom in winter.

Landscapes designed with evergreen hedges & entries, cultivate the eye, songbirds, & increase property value. Chinese snowball, above. Pathways should flow around your entire property, no dead ends. 'Tardiva' hydrangea blooming, above.


Use wit & whimsy in your landscape, above. Beware, CUTE, it's treacherous.


Start your landscape design from inside your home, Vanishing Threshold. Patio, above, viewed from my kitchen sink.

Design your landscape for February. It will be gorgeous all year. View, above, from my living room.


Site deciduous understory trees, crape myrtle, above, to shade your home from summer sun. Window, above, views stone terrace, below. Summer's blanket of rudbeckia gives way to smooth Tennessee gray flagstone the rest of the year.

If you're new to gardening in the South you'll adore, A Southern Garden by Elizabeth Lawrence, and, Hudson's Southern Gardening by Charles Hudson. Use your local Extension Service for specific advice to your county/state. The Garden In Winter, by Rosemary Verey is an incredible garden design book. My 5 books ( 3 on garden design, 2 on plants) are at the right, scroll down.
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Tara's Trinity Of The Southern Garden is gorgeous, low maintenance & a workhorse of your Southern garden design.
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Today is GARDEN DESIGNERS BLOGLINK across America. 12 garden designers sharing what's unique to their region. ENJOY !!!!!
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Jocelyn Chilvers (The Art Garden) – Wheat Ridge, CO
Susan Cohan (Miss Rumphius’ Rules) - Chatham, NJ
Michelle Derviss (Garden Porn) – Novato, CA
Dan Eskelson (Clearwater Landscapes Garden Journal) – Priest River, ID
Laura Livengood Schaub (Interleafings) – San Jose CA
Susan Morrison (Blue Planet Garden Blog) – East Bay, CA
Pam Penick (Digging) – Austin, TX
Susan Schlenger (Landscape Design Viewpoint) – Charlottesville, VA
Genevieve Schmidt (North Coast Gardening) – Arcata, CA
Ivette Soler (The Germinatrix) – Los Angeles, CA
Rebecca Sweet (Gossip in the Garden) – Los Altos, CA
Become a Fan of Blue Heron Landscape Design on Face book – http://bit.ly/yq1XT
Read the Blue Heron Landscapes Blog: http://www.bhld.wordpress.com/
Become a Fan of Blue Heron Landscape Design on Face book - www.bit.ly/yq1XT
Follow me on Twitter: www.twitter.com/ScottHokunson
Connect with me on LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/scotthokunson
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Garden & Be Well, XO Tara
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All pics my garden except hedge with window. Took that pic while writing one of my books.

12 comments:

Brenda @Cozy Little House said...

I had a hydrangea that I lost when I didn't realize our sprinklers weren't working on that side of the garden home, where I seldom go. (Street side) I'm going to get some more this year, as I have lots of shade. And that shade on this side are the crepe myrtles, pretty large now. On the other side are oaks.
Brenda

ScottHokunson said...

Beautiful pictures and great tips. You have an awesome view from your living room, inspirational!
Scott

Deviant Deziner, aka Michelle said...

Tara,
You put together a lovely tour of Georgia.
I could almost smell the sweetness of your beautiful gardens.
And I love this quote " Beware, CUTE, it's treacherous."
Reminded me of a old college day saying " Cute is not an Architectural term".

Best,
Michelle

Jocelyn H. Chilvers said...

Tara, so fun to see such beautiful flowering shrubs that we just can't grow here (well, a few hydrangeas, maybe). Thanks for brightening a cold, snowy day!

Devon said...

Perhaps an idiotic gardening question, but would this combination work in Seattle? Because my winter garden is AWFUL. Everything is dead or dormant. :(

Susan said...

I love both Hydrangea (particularly Oakleaf) and also Rosemary Verey...saw her garden in England...amazing!

Nice post and pics.

Ivette said...

All those blooms! All those blossoms! HYDRANGEAS!!! An embarrassment of riches. Thanks for the tour...

Dan Eskelson said...

Thanks for your post, Tara, and also for your comment on my blog - see response there.

I was quite surprised to see the Annabelle Hydrangea mentioned on your page - I had assumed it was a 'Northern' plant...fairly indestructible here - glad it can be grown in the south also!

Thanks again for your good words. I have added a link to your blog to my Blogroll.

Dan

Susan aka Miss. R said...

What a lovely post. You've taken the southern ideal and made it accessible, fun and inspirational. Thanks for sharing your Georgia viewpoint with us.

Shirley said...

Hi Tara,
I enjoyed your regionally appropriate gardens and it was breathtaking to see your "trio plant combo" in climate that supports it!

Los Angeles has it's share of these plants but they don't thrive as they do in the South.

Your gardens have warm and happy personalities. I'm sure your clients find them to be a wonderful greeting at the end of the work day!

Shirley Bovshow
Garden World Report

Laura Livengood Schaub said...

Oh I want that Chinese Snowball NOW! Thanks for sharing your Georgia garden, especially the view from your kitchen sink (isn't that one of the most important views of all!?)

bobbuckley84 said...

Great photos. Very beautiful landscaping work. Also, thanks for the links. Definitely good resources for newbie landscapers.
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