Wednesday, December 30, 2009

LANDSCAPE TRANSITIONS

TRACTOR CHICK hired me for her new home, below, enveloped by bare red clay. Her mission statement was clear. A challenge, and fun to work with. In a few days the new landscape will be complete. AND HERS. Odd feelings are erupting.
One of several hallways, above, in her new garden. A Crape Myrtle 'Natchez' allee.

My garden, above. No need to feel I'm doing without.
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Bittersweet to hand over TRACTOR CHICK's landscape. It's already a life force. Her life force. I merely chiseled a statue from stone. It was there all along. Oh my, this must be a form of separation anxiety!! Intellectually I know the garden will only get better as TRACTOR CHICK takes over.
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So why am I pouting?
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Garden & Be Well, XO Tara

5 comments:

houseitemsandroomsilike said...

Tara,

Will the fence get some stain?

vignette design said...

I get that feeling too when I've completed my project and now it's up to the owner to maintain. Will they take care of it and nurture it? I'm sure Tractor Chic loves what you did too - I sure do! --Delores

Terry said...

I understand the bittersweet. My architect friend says that he lives with a project, sometimes for years. It's just as much his as it is his client's. Then it's finished and he has to leave and they even take his key. Tracy Kidder's "House" conveys the "end of the project blues." But in "House" the architect returns to see how the clients actually live in the space.

the gardeners cottage said...

Maybe you are not pouting, but grieving. You are like a mommy who just raised a child and has to let it go in order for it to grow. Hard but necessary. Gardens mimic life, isn't that what you've been teaching us!

~janet

Tara Dillard said...

TRACTOR CHICK lives in a planned community with strict rules. Fences cannot be stained and they are all scalloped as shown.

With prior approval we were able to make quite a few changes to the rules. However, we Had to put grass in the front yard.

XO T